What's New in the NI LabVIEW 2014 Real-Time Module

Publish Date: Aug 01, 2014 | 11 Ratings | 4.09 out of 5 |  PDF

Overview

Increase your development efficiency and build more capable test, control, and monitoring applications with the NI LabVIEW 2014 Real-Time Module. With this LabVIEW add-on, you can use the latest technologies, like connecting USB 3.0 devices or incorporating an embedded UI, to reduce complexity in your software architecture.

Table of Contents

  1. Implement a Local HMI With Embedded UI Support
  2. Ethernet over USB Connection for Simplified Target Configuration, Debugging, and Maintenance
  3. Modbus Library API
  4. Real-Time Trace Viewer
  5. USB 3.0 Support
  6. 12-Core CPU Support on Phar Lap ETS Targets
  7. Additional Resources

1. Implement a Local HMI With Embedded UI Support

To simplify the complexity of your control and measurement system, the new embedded UI capability of NI Linux Real-Time on an NI cRIO-903x or NI cDAQ-913x eliminates the need for a stand-alone human machine interface (HMI) by incorporating it directly into your controller. The LabVIEW 2014 Real-Time Module includes support so you can use a single real-time VI to iteratively develop both your user interface and system logic on your host machine. This speeds up the system creation process.

 

Figure 1.  Incorporate an embedded UI directly into applications running on an NI cRIO-903x and NI cDAQ-903x.

Back to Top

2. Ethernet over USB Connection for Simplified Target Configuration, Debugging, and Maintenance

With the LabVIEW 2014 Real-Time Module, you can easily connect real-time targets running NI Linux Real-Time to a host computer using a USB connection. The USB device port is intended for device configuration, application deployment, debugging, and maintenance. For example, you can install a software or driver update through the USB device port during field maintenance instead of interrupting communication on the RJ45 Ethernet ports.

 


Figure 2. An automatic DHCP network is created over the USB Device Port allowing for system updates apart from the physical Ethernet connection(s).

Learn About Connecting to Your Target via Ethernet over USB

Back to Top

3. Modbus Library API

Modbus is one of the most commonly used industrial protocols on the market. The LabVIEW 2014 Real-Time Module includes Modbus VIs to establish Modbus communication in LabVIEW. The new Modbus palette on the Data Communication palette provides VIs to control the requests that Modbus masters generate, determine when to send these requests, and operate on the responses that Modbus slaves send.

 

 

Figure 3. The LabVIEW Modbus Library provides low-level functions for greater flexibility and performance.


The Modbus VIs also come with getting started examples that illustrate the implementation of Modbus masters and slaves. Additionally, they include reference architectures such as the Redundant Modbus Masters example, which illustrates how to build redundancy into a Modbus application using the new Modbus API.

Read the Modbus Protocol Reference Guide to Learn How to Implement the Protocol in LabVIEW

 

Back to Top

4. Real-Time Trace Viewer

The LabVIEW 2014 Real-Time Module features the Real-Time Trace Viewer, which you can use to capture the timing and execution data of VI and thread events for applications running on a real-time target. Prior releases of the LabVIEW Real-Time Module packaged the Real-Time Trace Viewer as a separate toolkit (Real-Time Execution Trace Toolkit). The Real-Time Trace Viewer displays the timing and event data, or trace session, on the host computer. In LabVIEW, select Tools»Real-Time Module»Trace Viewer to display the Real-Time Trace Viewer.

 

Figure 4. This execution trace shows threads associated with an application running on a real-time system. By examining a trace of a VI, you can see memory allocations, shown by flags.

Learn More About the Debugging Capabilities of the Real-Time Trace Viewer

 

Back to Top

5. USB 3.0 Support

The LabVIEW 2014 Real-Time Module features support for USB 3.0 on select NI Linux Real-Time targets. USB 3.0 builds on USB 2.0 to offer a higher throughput and can provide 4.5 W of power to peripheral devices. You can connect compatible devices such as USB 3.0 cameras to your real-time target to benefit from increased stream throughput and more simultaneous device connections.


Figure 5. This Basler ace USB3 camera is compatible with USB 3.0. The USB3 Vision standard offers a plug-and-play, bus-powered, high-bandwidth interface.

Explore Using USB 3.0 Cameras With NI Products

 

Back to Top

6. 12-Core CPU Support on Phar Lap ETS Targets

The LabVIEW 2014 Real-Time Module includes support for CPUs with up to 12 cores on Phar Lap ETS targets. Previously, the module supported only eight CPU cores even if the target had more available. With graphical programming, you can intuitively multithread your applications, implement parallel programming strategies, and harness the power of multicore processors. You can explicitly assign LabVIEW Timed Loops to execute on these extra CPU cores.

Learn More About Multicore Programming Fundamentals

 

Back to Top

7. Additional Resources

View a Complete List of New LabVIEW 2014 Features

Evaluate LabVIEW Real-Time and LabVIEW FPGA Programming With the LabVIEW RIO Evaluation Kit

Learn How to Cost-Effectively Upgrade Your NI Software With the Upgrade Advisor

Purchase the LabVIEW Real-Time Module Now

 

The registered trademark Linux® is used pursuant to a sublicense from LMI, the exclusive licensee of Linus Torvalds, owner of the mark on a worldwide basis.

Back to Top

Bookmark & Share


Ratings

Rate this document

Answered Your Question?
Yes No

Submit