5 Things You Didn't Know About Your PXI Chassis (Part 2 of 3)

Publish Date: Apr 20, 2015 | 5 Ratings | 3.60 out of 5 | Print

Overview

After reading part one of the three part series, you now know that your NI PXI chassis has hot-swappable cooling fans, full-hybrid peripheral slots, and field-replaceable power supply that can be changed in minutes without removing any I/O connections. But even still, NI PXI chassis have a lot more functionality.

Here are 5 more things you probably don’t know your NI PXI chassis offers you.

Table of Contents

Continue to Part 3 →


1. Differential Star Trigger

The system timing slot of the NI PXIe-1085 chassis has three dedicated differential pairs that you can use for high-speed triggering, synchronization, and clocking with a maximum slot-to-slot skew of 150 ps. To take advantage of this, you must insert a timing and synchronization module (for example, the NI PXIe-6674T) in the system timing slot (slot 10 on the NI PXIe-1085 chassis).

View pages 1–9 of the User Manual for more information on the system timing slot of the NI PXIe-1085 chassis.


Figure 1. PXI Express Differential Star Connectivity Diagram

 

2. Rack-Mount Kit

The 18-slot NI PXIe-1085 chassis fits perfectly in a standard instrumentation rack for automated test applications. With the rack-mount kit, you can flush-mount the chassis or recess it up to 6 in. in half-inch increments.

 

Figure 2. Side View of an NI PXI chassis With Optional Rack-Mount Kit Attached and Ready for 
Installation in a Standard Instrumentation Rack

 

3. 10 MHz REF SMA Connectors

When the 10 MHz Ref In connector on the front panel of the NI PXIe-1085 chassis detects a signal, the backplane automatically phase locks the PXI_CLK10, PXIe_CLK100, and PXIe_SYNC100 signals to this external clock and distributes these signals to the peripheral slots for synchronization.

Additionally, you can use the 10 MHz Ref Out connector to route the backplane’s PXI_CLK10 to another chassis for synchronization. You can insert a timing and synchronization module (for example, the NI PXIe-6674T) in the system timing slot (slot 10 on the NI PXIe-1085 chassis) to drive the PXI_CLK10 of the NI PXIe-1085 chassis.

 

Figure 3. 10 MHz Reference In and Out SMA Connectors on the NI PXIe-1085 Chassis 
for Multichassis Synchronization

4. Remote System Health Monitoring

The NI PXIe-1085 chassis has an Ethernet port on the rear panel that you can use to monitor the chassis operating parameters remotely over a network.


Description: Untitled:Users:afoster:Desktop:14 Things White Paper:ethernet_port.png

Figure 4. Ethernet Port on the Rear of the NI PXIe-1085 Chassis


Through the remote monitoring Ethernet interface of the chassis, you can access a web page with information about the current chassis operating parameters. Enter the IP address or hostname assigned to the chassis in the Internet browser’s address bar.

Description: Untitled:Users:afoster:Desktop:14 Things White Paper:web_portal.png

Figure 5. PXI Chassis Configuration Web Page for the NI PXIe-1085 Chassis

 

5. Remote Power On/Off

When a PXI system is located in a larger automated test system or a remote location, the ability to control the power without physically pressing the power button on the front of the chassis is beneficial. When the inhibit mode switch is set to the Default position, a controller must be present when the power button is pressed for the chassis to turn on.

 

Figure 6. Inhibit Mode Set to Manual on the Rear of the NI PXIe-1085 Chassis

 

When the Inhibit Mode switch is set to the Manual position on the NI PXIe-1085 chassis, you can use the Inhibit signal (active low) on pin 1 of the Remote Inhibit and Voltage Monitoring connector to power off the chassis. When you remove this connection, the chassis turns on.

Use tables 2–4 of the User Manual to identify the Inhibit (Active Low) pin of the connector on the rear of the NI PXIe-1085 chassis.

Continue to Part 3 →


Next Steps

In case you missed it, don't forget to read part one of the three part series, 5 Things You Didn't Know About Your PXI Chassis (Part 1 of 3). And be sure to stay tuned for the third and final article in the series.

 

Back to Top

Bookmark & Share


Ratings

Rate this document

Answered Your Question?
Yes No

Submit