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The following table lists the revised names for analog output terminal names. Original Terminal Names Revised Terminal Names Explanation DAC0OUT AO0 An analog output channel DAC1OUT AO1 An analog output ...

Requirement Use hardware-timed counter input operations to drive a control loop. Solution Use the Wait For Next Sample Clock function/VI to synchronize the counter operations with the counter's sample ...

Requirement I/O needs to be hardware-timed. All output values need to simultaneously update at the arrival of the sample clock edge. The application uses the Timed Loop. Solution Use the DAQmx Create Timing ...

For devices that support it, a time trigger pauses an acquisition or measurement at a specific time. If the specified time has already elapsed, you will get an error message indicating the time has already ...

Timing and triggering are important in NI-DAQmx. The clocks section explains clocks and handshaking. The triggering section goes over the triggers—such as a Start Trigger and a Reference Trigger—and common ...

With NI-DAQmx simulated devices, the following timing and triggering considerations exist: NI-DAQmx simulated devices simulate timing for continuous analog input, digital input, and all output tasks. Timing ...

The frequency of the counter output must be evenly divisible into the frequency of its timebase. The resulting period is further divided by the duty cycle, which defines how long the signal stays high ...

Digital I/O and DAQ devices typically use the single-cycle timing response mode, meaning the device responds to an external signal by the next active sample clock edge. Devices that support the pipelined ...

A counter contains several advanced terminals that you can use to perform time measurements and generate pulses. For most applications, NI-DAQmx automatically makes the proper routes from the terminal ...

The following table lists the revised names for counter terminal names. Original Terminal Names Revised Terminal Names Explanation GPCTR1_SOURCE CTR1SOURCE Placed as a hint next to the PFI terminal where ...

The following example illustrates the difference between physical and virtual channels and demonstrates how to create virtual channels with the API. Problem Create an NI-DAQmx virtual channel to measure ...

Raw data is in the native format and organization of the device, read directly from the device or buffer without scaling or reordering. The native format of a device can be an 8-, 16-, or 32-bit integer, ...

You can create scales to specify a conversion from the prescaled units measured by a channel to the scaled units associated with your transducer or actuator. For input channels, the scale converts samples ...

This section describes sample applications that demonstrate the functionality for hardware-timed single-point operations on real-time platforms. Most of these applications use the Wait For Next Sample ...

All NI-DAQmx simulated devices return analog input data in the form of a full-scale sine wave with 3% of full-scale noise. When multiple channels are in the task, the data for each channel is offset 5 ...

A Reference Trigger establishes the reference point in a set of input samples. You can configure this trigger to occur on a digital edge, a digital pattern, an analog edge, or when an analog signal enters ...

Even though you have set the sample mode parameter on the Timing function/VI to Finite Samples, the acquisition runs continuously until the Reference Trigger occurs. The number of posttrigger samples in ...

There are four primary ways to transfer data across the PCI bus: Direct Memory Access (DMA), Interrupt Request (IRQ), Programmed I/O, and USB Bulk. Direct Memory Access (DMA) DMA is a mechanism to transfer ...

To create a multi-device route, the source and destination devices must share a trigger bus both physically and logically in MAX. For PCI devices, you must register your RTSI cable in MAX. For more information ...

Deployment refers to developing an application so that it can be distributed, or deployed, on a different computer than the one on which the application was developed. To deploy an application, you need ...

The task ceases to perform the specified operation when the task transitions from the Running state to the Committed state. To explicitly perform this transition, call the Stop Task function/VI. Notice ...

To find the device routing table for your device, launch MAX and select Devices and Interfaces. Click a device to open a tabbed window in the middle pane. Click the Device Routes tab at the bottom of the ...

Your device uses a sample clock to control the rate at which samples are acquired and generated. This sample clock sets the time interval between samples. Each tick of this clock initiates the acquisition ...

Digital level triggering starts, stops, or pauses an acquisition or measurement based on the value read on a digital line.

Devices that support an external voltage reference enable you to maximize the resolution of your device. If the voltages you want to generate do not exceed a certain level and you can supply an external ...

Glitching refers to the generation of a waveform in which, when transitioning from old samples in the buffer to new samples, a mixture of old and new samples is generated rather than just the new samples. ...

To explicitly start a task, call the Start Task function/VI. You auto-start a task when you perform some other operation that implicitly starts the task. For instance, calling a Read function/VI or a Write ...

A Start Trigger begins an acquisition or generation. You can configure this trigger to occur on a digital edge, a digital pattern, an analog edge, when an analog signal enters or leaves a window, or at ...

A subsystem is the circuitry (ADCs, DACs, clocks, triggers, timing signals, timing engines, and so on) that a device uses to acquire or generate samples. On DAQ devices, there are separate subsystems for ...

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